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Pink14 Preview: Advice for making space for ITSM

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“Carve out some time for service management and make it a priority”

Ahead of his presentation at the 18th Pink Elephant Conference and Exhibition (PINK14), David Mainville, CEO and co-founder at Navvia, gives his advice on ‘making space for service management’.

Conferences like PINK14 are an amazing opportunity to network with your peers, learn new techniques and to re-ignite our passion for service management.

But you know what?  As motivating as conferences can be, the most important question is “what do you do with the passion once you get home”?  That’s the topic of my presentation at PINK14 entitled “Making Space for ITSM”.

So what do I mean by “making space”?

Well, if I’ve learned anything during my 30+ years in service management, I’ve learned that it takes practice and commitment.  Service management needs to become a part of the daily routine, of both the practitioner and of the company.

In fact, anything worth doing in life takes practice – whether it is learning to play an instrument, mastering a sport or getting in-shape – practice makes perfect.  The problem is that for many organizations and practitioners, service management is seen as a project and not as a practice.

Documenting a new change management process because of a recent catastrophic failure, implementing a new service management tool, or tweaking a process because of a bad audit finding, is often confused with a service management practice.   It’s not that these things are bad unto themselves; it’s just that it’s a bit shortsighted.

We come back from our conference all fired up, but all our great intentions are quickly overshadowed by firefighting and the daily demands of the job.  This noise gets in the way of a true practice.

Making space for service management means putting aside the time to do it right, and doing it right means following 5 critical steps.

The steps

  1. Carve out some time for service management and make it a priority.  In other words, there is a human element to the art of service management that can’t be ignored.
  2.  Develop a service management plan along with some short-term goals.  Many ITSM failures stem from either a lack of a plan or an overly grandiose one.  Focus on short term goals with measureable success criteria.
  3.  Build an alliance of co-workers because you can’t do service management alone.  If ITSM tools are the embodiment of a process, then people are the soul.  If you haven’t captured their support, ITSM will never succeed.
  4.  Create a structured and repeatable approach for implementing processes and tools.  You can’t be all over the map; you need something that works consistently for your first process and well as your last.
  5. Establish the discipline and governance to ensure an on-going program.  Building a process and implementing a tool is the easy work.  Accountability and buy-in is much harder – ensure you have management support and governance for your long-term program.

It’s been my experience, both as a practitioner, and as someone who practices service management in his own company, that following these steps is the best way to make real and lasting improvements.

Thanks and I look forward to seeing you at Pink!


David Mainville

David Mainville

To learn more find David at PINK14:

David will also be reprising the presentation for a webinar later in March.

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