Review: LANDESK Service Desk (Best in Class)

This independent review is part of our Self Service Market Review.

Also participating:

Commercial Summary

Vendor LANDESK
Product LANDESK Service Desk
Version reviewed 7.8
Date of version Release January 2015
Year Founded 1985
Customers 1000 worldwide
Pricing Structure IT-Users, fixed or concurrent license (ability for customers to mix licenses). Premise or SaaS Delivery. Unlimited End Users.

(Also alternatively available as part of LANDESK Total User Management package which is End User licensed only, unlimited IT Users)

Review

Elevator Pitch This is an excellent fully functional ITSM and wider IT Management suite of products, presented with a number of well-embedded links and functional capabilities.
Industry areas It’s aimed at the larger/Medium to Enterprise IT organisation and provides simple to use and user-friendly interfaces and options – e.g. workflow.
Unique points
  • Provides good standard ITSM across the board, plus some innovative features
  • Provides a good deal of automation to remove unnecessary tasks – e.g. adding screen print is simple so that this is not time consuming
  • New USP functions promised
Target market Medium to large enterprise.

Enterprise organisations looking to do integrated ITSM, good for user experience and self service and provisioning.

Solutions/ issues solved Excellent technical integration for auto-provisioning and other IT management functions – SSO, password reset etc.

A number of examples of client built screens and styles, genius bar integration – mobile interface, Chat.

Product/vendor gaps Some social interfaces not in product but these are available via partners – XMatters and Nexthink.
Positives
  • System automaton – run book automation – with service desk
  • Enterprise app store
  • All language codes supported for mobile and end user experience – Self Service set in the language of the user
  • Graphical workflow tool looks easy to use and build without code
  • Workspace – Overlay product that ties together multiple separate area of expertise – single presentation layer rather than having to switch between interfaces. Place you go to do your job
  • Self service embeds in SharePoint – with API
  • Simple button to switch between analyst dashboard and external view
  • Ability to provision software directly – e.g. with adobe, plus costing
  • Single sign on 3rd party authentication
  • Chat – support process with workflow, can create incident problem and change – direct link from self-service to change
  • Simple integration with remote control functions
Negatives
  • Social interfaces not in the product
  • May be overkill for smaller organisations – Self Service not available standalone
Overall view A good fit for high function ITSM and customer experience – particularly for their target market.

They should continue to gain market share because they are continually renewing with industry trends and innovations, whilst still providing strong basic functionality, e.g. moving to collaborative working using ‘workspaces’.

Vendor information

LANDESK-logo-RGBLANDESK’s self service capability empowers workers 24/7 from anywhere with instant access to the services and resources they need, when they need them. The solution offers a consumer-style experience that frees users to help themselves easily. You improve the relationship with your end-user customers and boost their productivity and that of IT staff with minimal effort.

  • Users can log and track issues, search knowledge to help themselves, reset passwords, and collaborate through IT social discussion
  • Users can see and request the services they’re entitled to. Automate software and service deployment for zero-touch provisioning
  • Follow the same IT processes tied to SLAs as if users were calling in. Offer a consistent support experience regardless of the route to the service desk.
  • Easy access from anywhere through an app from the Apple App Store for iOS, through Google Play for Android mobile devices, or through a responsive web app.

Screenshots

 

 

Service Catalogue 2013 Group Test – The Results

This is a review of software products and vendors in the ‘Service Catalogue’ market area.

This is a complex and varied market place and consideration should be given to the Market Overview section.


Download Review

(Free PDF, No Registration Required – 405kb, 8 Pages)


Service Catalogue 2013 Best in Class: Axios Systems
Service Catalogue 2013 Best in Class: Axios Systems

Service Catalogue 2013 Best in Class

  • Axios – scalable to big customized projects as well as nice UI for OOTB implementations. Strategic ITSM focus.

Of the other products reviewed, these areas were of particular note:

Best for MSPs and Small/Medium Organizations: 

Best for Enterprise Organizations:

  • ServiceNow – particularly for large implementations where customization is expected. Good product and corporate fit

Service Catalogue Market Overview

By Barclay Rae

Service Catalogue Approach

large ‘Service Catalogue’ market is a niche sub-set of the IT Service Management (ITSM) Software market, which has seen considerable interest and growth in recent years.

Whilst ‘Service Catalogue” can be given a clear definition, the term can be and often is used to cover a number of functional and strategic approaches that stretch from fairly low-level request fulfilment to strategic Service Design and Strategy.

This approach varies because there are several different components that can be described as ‘Service Catalogue” – from ‘front-end’ portal to ‘back-end’ workflow and high-level business views of services. There are also potentially a number of different inputs and outputs – and types of document – that can be described as part of the ‘Service Catalogue’.

This reflects the developing nature of how the industry has defined and understood what a ‘Service Catalogue’ is, which has led to some fundamental differences and interpretations of how to make this work and what the expectations are from implementation.

In a nutshell the 2 main different approaches are:

Strategic/Top Down

This is where the organisation takes a strategic view of all IT services – including the business services (applications/departmental services, external customer services). Usually this will lead to a definition of an overall service structure of Core IT Services (PCs, Phones, email etc.) and Business Services (departments, business processes, applications).

This can then drive service reporting and service differentiation and is a long-term strategic approach to ‘service’ management and value demonstration. Request fulfilment follows out of this process, once the overall structure has been defined.

Technical/Bottom Up

This tends to be started by technical teams to ‘discover’ services, solve specific configuration management and integration problems and provide a practical user interface for consumption of core services and request fulfilment.

Both approaches are viable and necessary at some point to lead to a successful implementation:

Top Down is useful to ensure that the whole IT organisation is on board and that the wider goals and expectations are defined as part of a customer engagement process. Visualisation is useful for all parties to have a tangible view of the overall goals for IT.

Bottom Up can be a good tactical approach to get moving quickly. Request Management automation usually provides efficiency benefits and can significantly improve service quality to customers. The strategic view will need to be defined at some point so should be considered whenever (and as soon as) possible.

For the purposes of this review both of the above approaches have been considered and the overall key elements for tools defined as follows:

  • General – user friendly and with proven integrations to other tools
  • Service Design – the ability to create a database of service records, containing a number of business and technical attributes, processes and workflows
  • Service Structure – the ability to organise and structure these services into a hierarchy of services and service offerings – ideally in a graphical format
  • User Request Portal – a user friendly portal with an intuitive interface to request and track services
  • Request Fulfilment – request management workflow and functionality that can be easily used and configured by system users
  • SLA and Event Management – the ability to define SLAs that can be linked via Event Management to other ITSM processes
  • Demand Management – the ability to provide real-time allocation and monitoring of service consumption, with e.g. financial calculations
  • Dashboard – real-time user-friendly graphical monitoring and analysis of usage, trends and metrics across services and to various stakeholders
  • Service Reporting – the ability to present output that summarises individual and ‘bundled’ service performance, consumption, SLA and event performance – in user-friendly, portable and graphical format

See the full list of criteria here

Approach to Implementation

Organisations and their practitioners who are considering buying and implementing Service Catalogue technology should consider the following:

  • As there are a number of potential applications and objectives for Service Catalogue, these must be clearly defined and agreed in advance. This shouldn’t be embarked upon because it is the ‘flavour of the month’ or it ‘looks like a good thing to do’.

Key benefits that can be derived:

    • Improved professionalism and quality of service experience to customers
    • Value demonstration of IT through business and service based reporting
    • Clarity around service differentiation and value – e.g. commodity versus quality, value-add, time to market
    • Improved cost efficiency of request management and administration
    • Improved quality and speed of service for request management and administration
    • Greater visibility of IT costs and service level performance
    • Improvement in Service Desk performance via better central access to information
  • It is vital that all participants not only understand the expected benefits and objectives, but are also clear on the taxonomy of Service Level Management. This saves considerable time during projects, due to the fact that there are often many misconceptions and variances in understanding around basic concepts like SLAs, Service Catalogue etc. Time spent on some explanations and clarification of definitions is time well spent.
  • The big mistake that orgnaisations still make is to try to do Service Level Management (Portfolio Management, Request Management, SLAs and Service Catalogue…) all without engaging with their customers and supported businesses. The process requires engagement (service definition, performance discussion, objective setting, feedback on the customer experience etc.) as a major input to this process. This provides business validation as well as improving the relationship and demonstration of understanding between parties. It also vitally provides clear goals in terms of service provision and performance reporting. Without this the process can completely miss out on customer requirements and expectation, and so is wasteful, arrogant and bad PR.
  • Organisations should define their services in a simple structure – ideally that can be visualised and shown on 1 page or 1 slide for clarity. This can be done in a workshop, where key people are brought together to work through the concepts and definitions (this can begin with some education) and then use this to define the service structure for that organisation. There are always ‘learning curves’ to be overcome (e.g. the distinction between ‘systems’ and ’services’) – however if this is done in a workshop then this build momentum and consensus.
  • The Service Structure is a vital element as it provides the visual key to this process and also then the framework for a repository of information on each service. From this the project can start to create other outputs, documentation and service views as required from the project goals.
  •  Getting started and moving is a vital element to avoid long term prevarication and too much theorising. A lot can be achieved relatively quickly with some workshops and brief customer meetings. It’s essential to produce a simple representation of the service structure that helps to visualise the process for all involved and give them a consistent view of what is being delivered and defined. All this can be done within a few days and weeks based around workshops and a clear set of objectives.
  • Ultimately this is a business-focussed process so it’s important to have people with business and communications skills to work on the project. Technical details and understanding will be needed but should not be the starting point, which tends to be what happens if this is given to technically-focussed people.

Market Products

Products in this area fall into 2 main categories:

  • Existing ITSM Toolsets with Service Catalogue functionality
  • Specific Tools with Service Catalogue and Request Management functionality

Existing ITSM Toolsets

These often will have either modular or intrinsic functionality based around the ‘ITIL’ framework – Incident, Request, Problem and Change Management, plus Asset and Configuration Management and Service Level Management.

The Service Catalogue should be a valuable addition to this with a ‘service layer’ that can be added to the existing task and event management functions, as well as providing customer/user-friendly portals and ‘front-ends’ for requesting and tracking services.

Generally these products will be used by organisations to develop and to implement a ‘service strategy’ – as well as implementing request management – so these will generally follow a more ‘top down’ approach.

Ideally these will be able to leverage work already down defining existing ITSM processes and the Service Catalogue can then easily integrate with these. This is not always the case, as previous configuration structures may need to be revised to meet new Service Structure requirements.

Specific Service Catalogue Tools

These are newer, standalone systems that have come into the market in the last few years – initially as there was little functionality in this area in the existing ITSM tool market.

They will generally follow a more technical ‘bottom up’ approach that provides faster and more agile implementations. So they can deliver high quality user interfaces, discovery and request management workflow in short timeframes and deliver fast Return on Investment (ROI)/Time to Value (TTV) around the automation of a number of manual processes that speed up the customer experience.

Challenges can include how to reverse-engineer these systems for a strategic service structure once in operation, plus the need to integrate with a variety of other tools, including the existing ITSM solution.

These tools all have some level of basic Help-desk/Incident Management and support processes – the level to which these can either be used or integrated depends on the requirements and maturity of the existing systems (and organisations)

Market Observations

  • ‘Service Catalogue’ is a term that can encompass a number of areas – request management, user portal, service strategy and design, SLAs, portfolio management, service reporting, customer, business and technical views. There is no single product or view that is definitive and products that focus on one area only will require some technical and process integration.
  • In key areas of request management, portals and workflow, reporting and SLAs, most products offer very similar functionality. Variations exist in the development of Demand Management, strategic Service Design and Service Visualisation.
  • In particular vendors can be differentiated by their approach – strategic and technical, but also the level to which they can offer support and value added services to help with implementation. This is still a relatively new area and few practitioners and/or organisations have broad experience or even clear requirements for how to make this work – vendor support and guidance is a key asset and differentiator.
  • Implementation support should also be in the form of template and standard configurable data – i.e. to provide sample service ‘bundles’, workflows, reports, dashboards and in general as much practical guidance as possible.
  • Whilst implementation approach and product focus are the key differentiators – i.e. strategic vs technical Bottom Up / Top Down – a key strength is also the ability to show a clear path that encompasses both approaches.
  • Integration experience and proven capability is a key capability (more than just a differentiator) – this will always be required to some extent:
  • For ‘Service Catalogue Specific’ vendors this is essential to get their product working with a variety of monitoring, asset and event management tools, as well as interfacing with other ITSM systems. Usually they will offer a number of existing APIs and proven links as part of their approach. These tools are useful for standalone Service Catalogue implementation at mid-market level and can also be found sold into enterprise organisations at the technical and integration level.
  • For ‘Existing ITSM Vendors’ they will lead on the seamless integration with their own tools. This is a good pitch for their existing customers but a dilemma for the wider market, i.e. whether to buy a standalone Service Catalogue product (from one ITSM Vendor) separately from a new or existing ITSM product from another ITSM vendor. Many of these vendors will have already created links to other systems via their multi-source and managed services clients.
  • In all aspects of this area, consideration should be given to the customer experience in using these systems and the interaction with IT organisations, particularly in terms of how SLAs and service delivery expectations are set.
  • These toolsets can help to improve service quality and experience, as well as improving the value demonstration of IT. However this will not simply be delivered by tool implementation alone and care is required where systems and vendors promise this without some significant process and organisational change.
  • Overall the market has developed significantly in the last 2/3 years although most vendors are still developing their approach to financial and demand management. Some of this functionality is available across the market but generally only as reports and with some development rather than as an integral feature for dynamic business use.  

Market Positioning and Approach

Vendor

Mid-Market

Enterprise

 

Top Down

 

Bottom Up

Axios

question

Matrix42

question

Biomni

question

ServiceNow

question

    – Definitely

question    – Possibly

Top Down / Bottom up?

Vendor

 

Top Down

 

Bottom Up

Axios

  • Approach geared to Business and Tech services
  • Good UI with visualisation of services and structure

question

  • Vendor and product can start from discovery approach
  • Unlikely to be sold as SC only bottom up product

Matrix42

  • Little product or vendor focus Business or Top Down approach
  • May not be relevant for some clients – e.g. MSPs

  • Product and vendor geared to discovery approach
  • Excellent tool for fast implementation of Request and self service for IT products

Biomni

  • Little product or vendor focus on Business or Top Down approach
  • Commercial approach helps for quick start and visualisation

  • Product and vendor geared to discovery approach
  • Excellent tool for fast implementation of Request and self service for IT products

ServiceNow

  • Approach geared to Business and Tech services
  • Good strategic focus in dashboards and Demand Management functions

  • Can start from discovery approach
  • Sales focus on enterprise with Business and Tech capability

    – Definitely

question   – Possibly

Competitive Overview

Vendor

Overview

Strengths

Weaknesses

Axios

  • High-end option for Medium – Enterprise
  • Simple intuitive UI/OOTB
  • Seamless integration with assyst ITSM processes
  • UI
  • Strategic approach
  • Vendor capability
  • Not geared up for standalone SC implementation
  • May be overkill for technical or small implementations

Matrix42

  • Strong request and Catalogue functionality – technical focus
  • Good option for Tech-only implementations (e.g. MSPs)
  • Good Request and Catalogue functionality
  • Speed of implementation – doesn’t need other ITSM processes
  • Service Now integration
  • Lack of US/UK coverage
  • Approach – little strategic implementation focus
  • Functionality gaps

Biomni

  • Good functionality
  • Nice commercial approach
  • Good option for Tech-only implementations (e.g. MSPs)
  • Good intuitive functionality, commercial approach
  • Speed of implementation – doesn’t need other ITSM processes
  • Little Strategic implementation focus
  • Functionality gaps

Service Now

  • High end functionality, enterprise focus
  • Strong corporate backing and growth
  • Extensive functionality
  • Best Demand dashboard functions
  • Flexibility of product
  • UI busy and complicated
  • Flexibility of product
  • Organisation geared towards enterprise clients
  • Needs usability configuration/customisation

Product Deep Dive

Follow the links for a deep dive review of Service Catalogue features:

Further Reading


DISCLAIMER, SCOPE & LIMITATIONS

The information contained in this review is based on sources and information believed to be accurate as of the time it was created. Therefore, the completeness and current accuracy of the information provided cannot be guaranteed. Readers should therefore use the contents of this review as a general guideline and not as the ultimate source of truth.

Similarly, this review is not based on rigorous and exhaustive technical study. The ITSM Review recommends that readers complete a thorough live evaluation before investing in technology.

This is a paid review. That is, the vendors included in this review paid to participate in exchange for all results and analysis being published free of charge without registration. For further information please read the ‘Group Tests’ section on our Disclosure page.

Review: Axios assyst for Service Catalogue [BEST IN CLASS]

This independent review is part of our 2013 Service Catalogue Group Test.

Executive Summary – Axios (BEST IN CLASS)

Overview
  • High-end option for Medium – Enterprise
  • Simple intuitive UI/OOTB
Strengths
  • Seamless integration with assyst ITSM processes
  • UI
  • Strategic approach
  • Vendor capability
Weaknesses
  • Not geared up for standalone SC implementation
  • May be overkill for technical or small implementations
Primary Market Focus Based on the information provided, Axios typically market to large/very large customers with a minimum of 1000 business users.They are classified for this review as:Specialised Service Management Suite – Offering ITIL processes and proprietary discovery tooling.They provide Event and Monitoring bridges as integration points.

Commercial Summary

Vendor Axios Systems
Product Axios assyst
Version reviewed v10
Date of version release February 2012 (multiple feature packs since initial release)
Year founded 1988
Customers 982
Pricing Structure Axios state:

  1. “SaaS – Organizations that are focused on capital expenditures and do not want to be concerned with managing hardware.
  2. On-Premise – Organizations that would rather pay a larger upfront cost, keep their annual costs lower, and keep their data in house.
  3. On-Premise Pay-Per-Month – Organizations that would like to spread the costs across 3 or 5 years, keeping their upfront cost low, while at the same time keeping their data in house.Within each of these delivery models, users can have either concurrent or dedicated license or a mix of both.While these form the basic structure of our licensing options, variants within these options are also available.  Furthermore, if a client should, at any point, want to move between the different models, we will certainly provide for that capability.    The assyst solution supports both dedicated (named) and concurrent models to allow flexibility with all core functions covered under a single licence.”

largeIndependent Review

Axios is an established vendor with a track record in the ITSM market. The Service Catalogue product is a relatively recent addition, now seamlessly integrated into the wider ITSM product functionality.

The standard interface is clean, uncluttered and intuitive, and in many cases could be used Out of the Box (OOTB). The system provides extensive functionality with all requirements met, although some advanced demand management functions require extra configuration (will be in next release). assyst offers ‘multi-tenancy’ options with links to its Customer Service Groups (CSG) functionality, which allows for customer separation and simple service definition.

The seamless integration with the rest of the assyst ITSM functional areas makes it suitable for a ‘top-down’ approach. It has not been sold extensively as a stand-alone (Service Catalogue) product, although there are some customers and so it could support a ‘bottom up’ approach The vendor is geared up to sell and implement to the ITSM market in general rather than marketing the Service Catalogue as a separate product. The vendor has extensive experience of technical integration with other products.

This is a high-end product and would be suitable for medium and large enterprise implementations. It is an excellent option for existing or prospective assyst customers and is a simple and function-rich option for others, although it may be a high cost and over engineered option for those simply looking for a request portal to get started. It is a good option for enterprise clients who want an intuitive simple interface and minimal tailoring and configuration.

 Overview

  • Existing ITSM vendor
  • Established (25+ years) independent vendor competing with large framework vendors for enterprise-wide ITSM functionality
  • Relatively recent entry to Service Catalogue market – design has incorporated recent thinking and practice
  • Strong approach that meets strategic and technical approach
  • Meets all state requirements
  • Seamless integration with existing assyst ITSM process and event management engine
  • Good overall Service Catalog product and implementation service offering for assyst clients
  • Was designed as potentially standalone product
  • Excellent full functional option for enterprise and medium sized IT organisations

Strengths

  • Pitch and approach suggests strategic focus and capability in full strategic value of Service Catalogue
  • Follows Service Strategy and Service Design approach generally in line with ITIL v 3 onwards
  • Simple forms-based service design – creates service structure and relationships
  • Services integrate with existing CMDB data and existing Incident Problem and Change functionality and workflows.
  • Existing Customer Service Grouping (CSG) functionality is a strong offering for ITSM wide integration – good business-view option for Managed Services clients who require multi-tenancy ITSM with Service Layer.
  • Recent version has developed and improved slick interface for end users and IT users.
  • Request Management workflow simple and dynamic – looks easy to use for non-technical staff
  • Strong approach based on workshops and skills transfer to clients. Axios has an in-house global network of implementation staff with technical and process experience.
  • The product visualises service structure well, providing opportunity to see services and relationships. This is a key element in developing awareness and ‘buy-in’ across a number of stakeholders.
  • Established integrations with other ITSM and technical products
  • Mobile function allows full functionality
  • Meets all stated requirements

Weaknesses

  • May be over-rich ‘high end’ option where simple technical request management and portal is required
  • Mobile functionality late to market – relatively low pick up to date – particularly of standalone version
  • Designed to be a standalone product – Axios sales, marketing and implementation approach geared up more for large ITSM-wide sales cycle and projects
  • Some areas of Demand Management still to be fully implemented – can track and review consumption by reporting, but this needs to be developed as a dynamic real-time feature (next release)
  • Limited global recognition and limited partner network – limited pool of global expertise beyond in-house
  • Dashboard tool can involve some external technical work to develop beyond standard configurable offerings

assyst Service Catalogue Customers

In Their Own Words:

“For more than 25 years, Axios Systems has been committed to innovation by providing rapid deployment of IT Service Management (ITSM) software. With teams in 22 locations globally and over 1,000 successful customer SaaS and on-premise deployments, Axios is a worldwide leader in ITSM solutions, with an exclusive focus on ITSM.

Axios’s enterprise ITSM software, assyst, is purpose-built, designed to transform IT departments from technology-focused cost centers into profitable business-focused customer service teams. assyst enables better, faster, less costly delivery and support of IT services, and was developed to support current ITIL® best practices. Designed for SaaS and on-premise, assyst offers the latest in real-time dashboard technology, social IT management, mobility, reporting, resourcing and forecasting.

assyst allows our clients to offer unparalleled multichannel support, bringing substantial tangible business benefits. We take pride in our complete ITSM package, and all customer-facing staff is ITIL foundation qualified and all consulting staff is ITIL Service Manager (Expert / Master) qualified to ensure our customers get the best solution for their business.

In addition to recognition from leading organizations, including Gartner, Ovum and Forrester Research, we have been honored by the Service Desk Institute, PINK and HDI.  Axios Systems was also:

  • Ranked in the top 1% of software companies for financial stability in 2010 by Dunn & Bradstreet
  • First in the world to adopt ITIL®
  • Involved in the original ITIL V3 re-write

Axios is headquartered in the UK, with offices across Europe, the Americas, Middle East and Asia Pacific.”

Screenshots

Further Information

Group Test Index

This independent review is part of our 2013 Service Catalogue Group Test.