ITIL Roles – Which Roles Can Be Filled By One Person?

NevenZitek
Neven Zitek, SPAN

Just by looking at the sheer number of ITIL functions and roles may leave you wondering – how do you fit a limited number of IT staff into so many roles? It’s obvious that one person will act in several roles, but how do you optimally combine them? Of course, it all depends on the size of your organization, and which ITIL processes that you’ve implemented, but none of that changes the fact that some roles fit well together, and some of them don’t.

 

 ITIL roles that fit together within the Service Lifecycle

ITIL-CombinedRoles (1)

 

Figure 1: ITIL roles that can be managed by a single person, and the relationship between role and ITIL Service Lifecycle.

The Business Relationship Manager role is responsible for managing and maintaining good relationships with customers, and most importantly, ensuring that the Service Catalogue is adequately meeting customer needs. Because part of customer relationship is agreeing upon and respecting agreed Service Levels, the Service Level Manager and Business Relationship Manager roles fit well together. The Service Level Manager’s focus is more oriented toward initial negotiations of service levels, but that makes him a good candidate for Business Relationship Manager, as he will be very familiar with the customer’s needs.

Risk Manager and Service Continuity Manager are both oriented toward the future, looking for the best possible outcome in case of undesired events. They fit well together, as both roles are responsible for risk management, threat identification and mitigation, and ensuring minimum / or acceptable impact on service delivery in case those events actually occur. The difference is that the Service Continuity Manager is focused on Force majeure and disaster scenario events, and the Risk Manager is focused on risk assessment of individual assets and their vulnerabilities. However, even with those differences, these two roles can easily be filled by a single person.

The Capacity Managers responsibility is ensuring that all infrastructure and services (if provided externally) are able to deliver performance and capacity within agreed levels, in a cost-effective manner. These responsibilities match nicely with the Availability Manager role, adding responsibility for meeting the agreed service availability. Both roles include planning, measuring, analyzing and improving of available resources against agreed and expected service levels; however, Capacity Management is concerned with personnel resources as well (e.g., overnight backup not completed, as there was no technician to change tapes), and Availability Management is not. As both roles include monitoring / measuring performance of individual service components, this might be a perfect match to include the Problem Management role as well, as the Problem Managers main task is to prevent incidents from happening, and minimize the impact of incidents that do happen. Having insight into individual service components’ status should be a good argument for fitting the Capacity and Availability Manager roles within the Problem Manager role.

The responsibility of maintaining information about assets, Configuration Items (CI) and their relationship is upon the Service Asset and Configuration Manager. This very important, yet laborious role is very similar to the Knowledge Manager‘s role, whose responsibility is to maintain information about knowledge available. That similarity in processes justifies the decision to share those two roles within a single person.

And, as I mentioned before in an earlier post Incident Management: How to separate roles at different support levels, another good role-sharing fit is Incident Manager and Service Desk Manager. Even though the Service Desk Manager has a slightly larger scope of responsibilities, what those two roles have in common is the aim to resolve incidents as soon as possible. In general, Service Desk is the place where all incidents will be reported; therefore, it makes perfect sense to try and resolve them on the spot.

Combining roles is a challenge for both smaller and larger companies. Obviously, smaller companies are de facto forced to fit as may roles as humanly possible into a single person, as there is no alternative. Larger companies may have the luxury of splitting roles among as many persons as they find fit; however, with so many ITIL roles available, it may not be wise to dedicate a single person to ever single role just because you can. If you are so fortunate as to have all necessary personnel available to take all the roles, think about the workload across the lifecycle. For example, if you don’t plan on releasing new services on a daily basis, do you need one Test Manager and one Release Manager? (Note that you shouldn’t combine those two roles, so please continue reading to find out why.)

In my opinion and experience, combining ITIL roles is always an option, as long as you take workload and common sense into consideration.

ITIL roles that shouldn’t be mixed together within the Service Lifecycle

While these are good examples of a single person acting in a multi-role environment, there are some obvious and less obvious role combinations that should be avoided.

The obvious role combination that should be avoided is service Test Manager and Release Manager. While the Release Manager is responsible to plan, control and release a service into the live / operational environment, the Test Manager is responsible to perform all necessary testing to ensure that the service deployed meets requirements. It’s an obvious conflict of interest, as the Release Manager will strive to get the service operational as soon as possible, while the Test Manager will always want to take as much time as possible in order to test the service properly.

A less-obvious role combination that ITIL experts commonly agree should be avoided is Incident Manager and Problem Manager. The Incident Manger is responsible to handle an incident in a way that will result in fast incident resolution or workaround. The Problem Manager, on the other hand, is not interested in quick fixes, but rather on the root cause of the incident – which may take much more time than any Incident Manager is ready to accept.

Another less-obvious combination of ITIL roles that should be avoided is making a Service Owner (any) Process Owner as well. The Service Owner is responsible for delivering the service in question (e.g., e-mail service) within agreed service levels. A Process Owner (e.g., Change Management, Incident management, Service Portfolio Management, etc.) is responsible for ensuring that the process in question is fit for its purpose and is run in an optimal way. As Process Owner, this person is in charge of all other services he does not own for that particular process, and may start looking at other services through “Service Owner glasses,” which should be avoided if possible.

Combining ITIL roles – if at first you don’t succeed, try again

Just remember that ITIL is best practice framework with logical and easy to follow structure. Combining multiple roles for one person should be done using common sense – you wouldn’t appoint the same person to report to himself, or approve his own recommendations, budget, and technical solution, the same way you wouldn’t appoint a wolf to guard the sheep. Combining ITIL roles is a challenge, and it takes time and experience to understand and foresee potential pitfalls certain role combinations may bring upon you. On the other hand, you can use that time to notice and change eventual “bad fits” that may already exist.  Just don’t be afraid to make a change; if anything, ITIL is all about the change.

 

This article was contributed by Neven Ziteck of SPAN

Guardian News & Media: "Our SLA is to ensure the paper is published"

Guardian News & Media

Guardian News & Media (GNM) publishes theguardian.com, the third largest English-speaking newspaper website in the world. Since launching its US and Australia digital editions in 2011 and 2013 respectively, traffic from outside of the UK now represents over two-thirds of the GNM’s total digital audience. In the UK, GNM publishes the Guardian newspaper six days a week, first published in 1821, and the world’s oldest Sunday newspaper, The Observer.

theguardian_rgbGNM is a dynamic and pioneering news organisation across all departments. Amongst all this cutting edge transformation, GNM’s IT service desk has been going through its own upheaval. Over the last year the team has experienced arguably the most transformative change any service desk is likely to face—that of insourcing from a third-party outsourcer and rebuilding from scratch.

So what is life like for IT service management (ITSM) folks at GNM? How do they handle delivery of IT services for one of the world’s leading brands?  How have they insourced the service desk? These are all questions I was keen to ask when I met the team in London.


Note: SysAid commissioned this case study. Thank you to Vicky, Louise, and Steve from Guardian News & Media for being so candid and sharing their views. 


Meet the team

Left to right – Steve Erskine, Louise Sandford and Vicky Cobbett, Guardian News and Media
Left to right – Steve Erskine, Louise Sandford and Vicky Cobbett, Guardian News and Media

Insourcing the service desk

GNM has around 1,700 staff working for them globally. Roughly half of GNM staff work in commercial teams, the other half are in editorial teams including worldwide journalists and bloggers. The 60-member IT team supports 1,200 Macs, 800 PCs and twin mirrored datacentres in London and Bracknell.

The service desk was insourced from the 1st August 2013 when a team of six service desk analysts took over the front line of IT service and support.

The insource meant choosing a suitable solution to underpin its service management processes. Previously, the IT team was provided with technology as part of IT outsourcing contracts, such as Remedy or ServiceNow. With ITSM now firmly the responsibility of the in-house teams, there was a requirement for a smaller system that suited their needs. Flexibility and value for money were key drivers. Following a review of the market, the team chose SysAid.

A GNM version of ITIL

The IT support team at GNM records 600–650 incidents a week, working core hours of 8am until 6pm, with extended cover until 3am to support publication of the printed newspaper.

“We resolve as many calls as we can on the first line, not just log and flog, we try to do as much as we can and only escalate to second line if we get stuck,” said Vicky Cobbett, Service Desk Manager.

Incidents arrive in the way of system monitoring, email, telephone and walk ups. The team has not yet implemented any self-service options with SysAid, as they wanted to build up a reputation and confidence in existing channels first.

Third line teams are arranged by technology stack or competence area, such as business applications, networks, integrations, multimedia, AV, Oracle applications and so on.

“Our technology base is really quite broad,” says Steve Erskine, Technology Supplier Manager. “We are digital first. It’s a very different company than the newspaper I originally joined.”

“GNM is at the cutting edge of the media industry, it means we are constantly changing. We are constantly being brought new things to manage,” added Louise Sandford, Application Analyst.

Like most organizations that refer to best practice frameworks, GNM has cherry picked guidance from ITIL to suit its requirements.

“We’ve adopted a GNM version of ITIL,” says Steve.

“We have a Change Advisory Board (CAB) every Monday and use SysAid to manage all of our changes. If you look at the ITIL book, we’re not quite doing it the way ITIL suggests, we’ve taken the bits that are appropriate for us.”

“For example, we don’t have a change manager because of the diverse teams in our IT staff, but we make sure we follow a change management process and follow ITIL where appropriate.”

“Individual teams get direct calls too. We work in a deadline driven environment so things need to be resolved quickly. Sometimes you need to resolve the ticket before logging it,” said Louise. “We try not to get too caught up in process protocol – publishing the paper comes first.”

Our SLA is to ensure the paper is published each night and that our website remains online

Publishing the newspaper and keeping the website up in total alignment to business requirements was a recurring theme during our conversation. There is no time for navel gazing about service desk metrics at GNM. Its focus is on deadlines and the key priorities of the business seem familiar to the old fable about President Kennedy visiting the Space Center.

It is said that the President approached a man sweeping and said “Hi, I’m Jack Kennedy. What are you doing?” to which the janitor replied “I’m helping put a man on the moon, Mr President.”

I found their customer focus refreshing. I asked the team: “How do you know if you’re doing a good job? How do you measure success?”

“The newspaper gets printed. The website is always up,” said Vicky.

The team monitors call volumes, call open times and escalates where appropriate – but the main focus of meeting customer requirements is via the personal relationships developed by Business Relationship Managers (BRMs) who go out to the business and listen for requirements, help prioritize projects and develop a medium term plan.

“Success for me is if we can put processes and procedures in place without slowing the business down,” said Steve.

“We don’t get too caught up with measuring statistics. The company knows we work hard to close all tickets as quickly as possible and are focussed on helping the company print the paper and keep the website up,” said Vicky.

“In terms of statistics and metrics and comparing this year with last year – that’s not what we’re about… and I don’t think we’ll ever get to that point,” added Steve.

“We work in a vocal environment, if we’re not doing the right thing people will soon tell us. We also have our BRM team who are going out to the business to ensure we are doing the right thing and meeting their requirements.”

“We don’t really work to formal Service Levels. We might be working on something quite important to one person, but if something happens, which means we can’t get the paper out, everything gets dropped to fix it and that person will have to wait. If we’re going to breach a Service Level Agreement (SLA), we’re going to breach it. We’ve got to get the paper out.”

“Everyone in the company has this focus. It’s our purpose for being here,” added Louise.

Why SysAid?

As Application Analyst Louise is the main owner of SysAid. She has looked after the application since insourcing back in August and works with their account manager Yair Bortinger at SysAid.

GNM learnt from working with previous tools that despite all the bells and whistles on offer they would only end up using a small fraction of the features available. So a reason for choosing SysAid was that it is a smaller system and easier to customize to their own requirements.

“We find it user friendly,” says Louise. “With other systems we’ve worked with you have to stick to the templates or labels issued by the software company. SysAid is a lot more flexible to customize to your own requirements so you can label things the way you want them and in a way the whole IT department will understand. We use the cloud version so we can use it anywhere, we can use it at home.”

A quirky bunch

I asked the GNM team about their experiences with SysAid as a company. They were extremely complimentary. Specifically, the team stated that customer service was their strongest asset.

“They’re a quirky bunch,” said Vicky, “very, very friendly.”

“They are amenable and get back to you quickly,” added Louise.

“Sometimes when you work with software companies, you’ll deal with the salesperson and they are the friendliest person in the world, but once you’ve signed the contract the relationship changes. With SysAid, when we phone them up, they’re as friendly as the day we signed the contract,” said Steve.

“…And that’s not just one person, that’s everyone you speak to, the account management team, professional services, senior management,” said Louise.

“We sometimes ask the professional services team to do something completely random and weird and they say, yeah ok, we’ll do that for you,” said Vicky.

“I hope they don’t get bought and stay as they are. We are doing this case study because they are good not because of some commercial arrangement. We want to give something back in exchange for their great product and great service,” added Steve.

IT Service desk bar

The IT service desk ‘walk up’ desk. Situated away from the main IT department in a central position within the business.
The IT service desk ‘walk up’ desk. Situated away from the main IT department in a central position within the business.

The GNM IT team has built an “IT service desk bar” as a concierge desk for walk-in IT support enquiries. It is situated adjacent to a main stairwell and thoroughfare of the business and is intentionally separate from the rest of the IT department. Three service desk analysts work at the service desk bar, which accounts for around 15% of all incidents.

“It’s meant that we’ve built better relationships within the company. They see IT as having a face rather than being a voice at the end of a phone,” says Vicky

“But around 15%–20% of incidents come from the service desk bar. 50–60% come in via email and around 20–25% are phone calls.”

Customizing to requirements

Louise estimates that the split between in-house customization and development from SysAid is around 70/30.

“I do as much of the customization myself and liaise with Yair and the SysAid professional services team to do everything else,” said Louise.

“One of the great things we like about SysAid is that it’s so configurable and it’s very flexible. It is also quite user-friendly, so without a huge amount of configuration knowledge you can pick it up and use it quite effectively.”

User account creation, which was previously managed in Lotus Notes, is now handled by SysAid.

“That was a custom project they built for us. SysAid is used to automate the account creation of logins for new users. It’s completely out of scope for what SysAid is designed for but they’ve been very ‘can do’ about the whole project. It feels like a partnership,” said Vicky.

Future plans

Having embedded change management, the team aims to look at problem management in more detail and also plans to build an asset register to record laptops and desktops using SysAid. Knowledge management is also on the agenda, done at a steady pace with issues ironed out as they go.

“It’s such a small system in the grand scale of things in terms of all the systems we use. But it’s such an important one,” said Louise.


Guardian News & Media

  • The Guardian first published in 1821
  • Offices in UK, USA, Australia
  • Headquarters: King’s Cross, London, UK
  • Revenue Guardian Media Group Plc. £210M
  • Over 100million monthly unique browsers for theguardian.com
  • 1,700 staff, 60 IT Team staff
  • www.theguardian.com

Overall Review of SysAid by Guardian News & Media

“It’s a great tool, with great service,” said Steve.

Strengths

  1. Customer service from the SysAid team
  2. Ease of use
  3. Customization

Weaknesses

  1. Reporting – doesn’t have the depth we’d like but SysAid is addressing this in Q4 2014.
  2. Reverse customization – when you’ve built something by configuring it and need to undo it, it is not always straightforward. Some elements aren’t as friendly as others. Some of the workflow elements could be improved.

Ratings

  • Customer Service 9.5/10
  • Product 8.5 / 10
  • Reporting 5/10

Do Your Metrics Tell a Story?

Do your service management metrics tell a story? No? No wonder nobody reads them.

That was a tweet I sent a few weeks ago, and it’s had some resonance. I know that during my practitioner days, I missed many opportunities to tell a compelling story. I wanted everyone else to get the message I was trying to communicate, and couldn’t figure out why my metrics weren’t being acted upon. I had a communications background before getting into IT, so I should have known better.

Facts are not the only type of data

I’ve blogged about metrics a few times before. In “Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: 7 Ways to Improve Reception of Your Data” I shared a story about how my metrics had gone astray. I was trying to make a point to reinforce my perspective on an important management decision. In what became a fairly heated meeting, I found myself saying at least three different times, “the data shows…” Why wasn’t it resonating? Why was I repeating the same message and expecting a different result?

readingGo back and read that article to see how it resolved. The short answer: I lost.

I’d love to live in a world where only objective, factual data is considered when making decisions or influencing others; but we have to recognize two important realities:

  1. Other types of data, especially personal historical observations that often create biases, are more powerful than objective data ever could be.
  2. Your “objective” factual data can actually reduce your credibility, if it is inconsistent with the listener’s personal observations. As the information age moves from infancy into adolescence, we are becoming less trusting of numbers, not more.

So, giving reasons to change someone’s mind is not only ineffective, it can also make things worse. Psychological research indicates that providing facts to change opinion can cement opposing opinion more deeply than before.

Information, whether accurate or not, can be found that backs up almost any perspective. Why should I trust your data any more than the data I already have? Read the comments section from almost any news story about a controversial subject. How many minds get changed?

We need a reason to care

Why should I pay attention to, act on, or react to, your metrics if there is no compelling reason for me to do so? We have to give our audience a reason to care. We want the audience of ITSM metrics to do something as a result of the metrics. The metrics should tell a story that is compelling to your intended audience.

Let’s look at a fairly common metric – changes resulting in incidents. Frequently we look at the percentage of changes that generated major incidents (or any incidents at all). Standing alone, what does this metric say? Maybe it shows a trend of the percentage going up or down over time. Even so, what action or decision should be made as a result of that data? Without context we can look for several responses:

Service Desk Manager: “Changes are going in without proper vetting and testing.”

Application Development Manager: “We need to figure out why the service desk is creating so many incidents.”

IT Operations Director: “Who is responsible for this?”

CIO: “zzzzzzzz”

Who has the appropriate response? The CIO of course (and not just because she’s the boss)! The reality is that the metric means nothing at all. Which is kind of sad really, since there may actually be something to address.

Maybe the CIO will initiate some sort of action, but not until she hears a compelling story to accompany the metric. If the metric itself doesn’t tell the story, decisions will be made based on the most compelling anecdote, whether or not it is supported by the metric.

Metrics need to tell a story

At a new job around 15 years ago, I inherited a report that had both weekly (internal IT) and monthly (business leadership) versions. Since the report was already being run, I assumed it must be useful and used. The report consisted of the standard ITSM metrics:

  • number of calls opened last month vs. historical
  • incident response rate by team and priority
  • incident resolution rate by team and priority
  • highest volume of incidents by service
  • etc.

However after a few months I realized that nobody paid attention to these reports, which surprised me. According to ITIL these are all good metrics to pull. I saw useful things in the data, and even made some adjustments to support operations as a result. However, my adjustments were limited in scope, and the improvements I saw initially didn’t hold and so everyone simply went back to the “old ways”. The Help Desk team that reported to me did experience a sustained significant improvement in their first contact resolution rate, but all other areas of support saw nothing but modest improvements over time.

The fact is that the reports didn’t tell a compelling story. There were other factors as well, but looking back now I can see that the lack of a consistently compelling metrics story held us back from achieving the transformation for which we were looking.

So your metrics need to tell a story, but how?

The traditional ITSM approach to presenting data does a poor job at changing minds or driving action, and it can actually strengthen opposing perspectives. Can you think of an example where presenting numbers drove a significant decision? Most likely, the numbers had a narrative that was compelling to the decision maker. It could be something like, “our licensing spend will decrease by 25% over the next three years, and 10% every year after.” That would be a pretty compelling story for a CFO decision maker.

In my next article, we’ll look at how metrics can tell a compelling story.

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Teleopti Shines With 4 Star SDI Certification

Swedish WorkForce Management (WFM) and Telecom Expense Management (TEM) company Teleopti has been awarded a “coveted” 4 star Service Desk Certification maturity rating from the Service Desk Institute (SDI).

The company had held a 3 star certification since 2010. Teleopti’s service desk joins a select group of worldwide teams who have achieved a 4 star certification including those from Telefónica, Sodexo, tickets.com and Vocalink.

Performance spanning all concept criteria

Providing support to customers in over 70 countries, Teleopti’s multi-lingual service desk, situated in Sweden and China, was praised by SDI for “raising its performance across all concept criteria” during a period of rapid expansion in to new global markets.

Düring: 4-star performer
Düring: 4-star performer

The most notable areas of improvement were:

  • certification concepts of processes,
  • partnerships and resources,
  • customer satisfaction and,
  • social responsibility.

NOTE: The SDI’s SDC audit evaluates service desk operations against an internationally accepted global standard for best practice, providing companies with a benchmark to form a baseline for service improvements.

Based around ITIL and ITSM frameworks, this certification evaluates companies in the following areas: incident and problem resolution; change and release management; service level management; availability and capacity management; configuration management; business continuity and financial management; knowledge management and customer relationship management.

 “We are delighted to receive this recognition from SDI for the continuous investments in providing an exceptional level of support to our customers and partners. Closeness is an important company value and Service Desk is the corner stone in fulfilling this. In the annual customer survey, year after year, more than 9 out of 10 customers state they would recommend Teleopti as a vendor to other companies” says Olle Düring, CEO of Teleopti.

Service Desk Manager at Teleopti Maureen Lundgren expands upon Düring’s comments saying that increasing the firm’s Service Desk Certification maturity rating is the result of a company culture where the customer always comes first.

It is also down to a dedication to defining, refining and documenting roles, responsibilities and processes,” she said.

Howard Kendall, Master Auditor at SDI summarised by saying: “The 4 star Service Desk Certification rating is an excellent achievement and testament to the well-structured programme of continuous improvement that Teleopti has in place. Coupled with this, we have evidenced exceptional leadership and excellent communication to staff who in turn are consistently motivated and developed.”

Event Listing: Service Desk & SLM Seminar, itSMF UK, 12th September 2012, Manchester

What?

itSMF UK Seminar – Service Desk and SLM

The Service Desk is at the frontline to increase service quality, reduce cost and pressed to do more with less. Many are still searching for tools to help move them from their traditional fire fighting roles in-order to free up resources to more spend time on better managing customer expectations and improving service.

What are the best approaches to meeting this challenge?

This seminar is targeted at service desk, service level and service catalogue managers who want to ensure agreed customer expectations and promises are met

When?

Wednesday 12th September, 9am – 4pm

Where?

Museum of Industry & Science, Liverpool Road , Manchester, M3 4FP

Museum of Industry & Science Website

Map and Directions

Museum of Industry & Science (MUSI) in Manchester

Who?

itSMF UK

Agenda

Key learning outcomes of this seminar include:

  • Learn the processes that underpin a good service desk
  • Learn what are the key interfaces between the service desk, service level management and service catalogue
  • Learn how you know if you have got the right people working on your service desk
  • What is the skill profile and roles of a hybrid service desk manager and analyst
  • Learn which service desk structure is right for your organisation
  • Learn the challenges and approaches to managing a distributed or global service desk
  • Learn how to define a service catalogue with underpinning service levels that works for you
  • Learn how to get more out of 2nd line teams by implementing operational level agreements
  • Learn how to improve your workload planning and scheduling techniques to manage the service desk
  • Where will the service desk be in 5 years

Further Info…

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Service Management’s 4 Golden C’s: Codeless Configuration & Complete Customisation

Edinburgh Castle from Princes Park.

Cherwell Software has won a new customer for its Service Desk software solutions in the shape of Baillie Gifford, an independent investment management partnership based in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Baillie Gifford is one of the largest investment trust managers in the UK. The firm is wholly owned by 36 partners and manages in excess of £75 billion with 700 staff.

Complete Customisation

Having opted for the firm’s own-branded Cherwell Service Management product from Cherwell Software, Baillie Gifford says that it was drawn to its decision via the option to gain “complete customisation and seamless upgrades” with the tool.

Baillie Gifford’s IT service desk manager Rob Whittaker asserts that Cherwell has an intuitive product (with some products reviewed he found it difficult even to see how to log a call at first glance) that works using single step effectiveness i.e. it can be launched manually or automatically — and that this would help his team to save time and automate regular, repeatable tasks.

Codeless configuration

For its part, Cherwell also champions its “codeless configuration” technology and upgrades that could potentially save time and effort.

“When we started the review process, we had not heard of Cherwell Software,” said Gifford. ‘The company came up in an Internet search, and based on the demos and videos on its website and the fact that its sole business focus is ITSM, it became a candidate we wanted to see more from.”

Prior to the itSMF Annual Conference in November 2011, Baillie Gifford narrowed down its prospective list and reviewed four solutions at the show.

“During the two days, we visited the Cherwell stand three times,” said Gifford. “Unlike other stands, when we asked questions we weren’t just given a standard demo we were shown how the product would function. With the other vendors, features were always ‘coming soon’ or ‘could potentially’ do what we were looking for.  The Cherwell product matched what we had learned from their website. It’s built from the ground up and is not just shoe-horned onto another product.”

Before “go live”…

Following what it has described as a “stringent” software testing and evaluation process starting at the end of 2011, Baillie Gifford placed its order with Cherwell in early March 2012 and went ‘live’ with Cherwell Service Management on 21 May 2012. The company then spent a weekend migrating final data, live testing and rolling out.

“Cherwell offered us the product to test and evaluate prior to making a purchasing commitment,” said Gifford. “No one else offered us that. They allowed us to go away and actually use the software to make sure it met our needs. This told me that the company is confident that the product can do what they promise it will do.”

Cherwell Software 
is headquartered in Colorado Springs, USA and with its EMEA offices based in the UK. Cherwell’s wizard driven CBAT application development platform empowers users to create new screens, business processes and to develop additional business applications without the need for developer resources, bespoke coding or scripting services.

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